lexlifts:

thornsandwillows:

If you take a young man and woman and they both tell a stranger that they work in the same restaurant, it’s very likely that they will assume that the woman is the waitress, and the young man a cook.

But I thought a woman’s place was in the kitchen? Not when she’s being paid for it. I can’t believe it took me this long to realize the implication of this. A woman’s place is one of servitude.

this fucking hit me like a fucking train 

(via thebicker)

soulrevision:

bellahugo:

ratchetmelancholy:

White privilege is your history being taught as a core class and mine being taught as an elective. 

please let them know.

Welp

(via the-real-goddamazon)

Anonymous asked: Hi! So, um, I haven't read Remender's Cap, I'd like to know what he did to him. Can you tell me? Thank you.

chujo-hime:

Whatever you do, don’t read Remender’s Captain America, especially if you haven’t read any of the comics before. And here’s why:

  1. He fridged Sharon to just to make Steve cry. (see also: Women in Refrigerators by Gail Simone)
  2. Meet Jet Zola, Remenber’s OC and the most hyper-sexualized 14-15 year old girl in comic books
  3. He turned Steve’s father from a complex, broken but loving father who happened to suffer from alcoholism, into a walking stereotype – the drunk Irishman who beat his wife and couldn’t hold down a job.
  4. He fundamentally does not understand who Steve is as a character.
  5. His idea of taking the book in a “new direction” is to essentially rip off the stories Stan Lee, Mark Waid, and Ed Brubaker have already told.
  6. His response as a comic book professional to legitimate criticism of his writing? That you should go drown yourself in hobo piss.

A longer and more detailed essay about why Remender’s Captain America run is sexist, racist and basically being the exact opposite of everything Steve Rogers stands for, can be found here: Why Rick Remender Needs to Stop.

For new fans interested in reading Captain America, stay far, far, far away from the current book. Instead I would recommend:

  • Ed Brubaker’s run on Captain America (Volume 5 and Volume 6). I mean, not only would there be no CA:TWS the movie without Ed Brubaker, but the Bucky Clause would still be in effect.
  • Mark Waid’s run on Captain America (Volume 1 ##445-448 and Volume 3 #1-23), plus Captain America: Sentinel of Liberty and the mini-series Captain America: Man Out of Time. No other writer gets Steve like Mark Waid does, plus his Sharon is probably the single best example of the character in her 50+ year existence. 

kyssthis16:

negritaaa:

youngmarxist:

So if we have to show women what the baby looks like in their womb and tell them how the process works before allowing them to get an abortion, does that mean we should teach our soldiers about the culture of the lands we’re invading, and explain to them that the people we want them to kill have families and feel pain, just like Americans?

yooooooo

OOP!

(via newwavefeminism)

It feels like I quit life for a couple months - sorry about that.

Making my way back to shore.

“I don’t know why we long so for permanence, why the fleeting nature of things so disturbs. With futility, we cling to the old wallet long after it has fallen apart. We visit and revisit the old neighborhood where we grew up, searching for the remembered grove of trees and the little fence. We clutch our old photographs. In our churches and synagogues and mosques, we pray to the everlasting and eternal. Yet, in every nook and cranny, nature screams at the top of her lungs that nothing lasts, that it is all passing away. All that we see around us, including our own bodies, is shifting and evaporating and one day will be gone. Where are the one billion people who lived and breathed in the year 1800, only two short centuries ago?”

Alan Lightman, MIT’s first professor with dual appointments in science and the humanities and author of the immeasurably brilliant The Accidental Universe, considers our longing for permanence in a fleeting universe, something a different Alan – Watts – contemplated with equal, timeless poignancy half a century ago

More of Lightman’s singular mind and spirit here.

(via explore-blog)
gradientlair:

So gorgeous. This hair is what dreams are made of.

gradientlair:

So gorgeous. This hair is what dreams are made of.

(Source: 10lifestyle2)

drawcoffee:

Brewing Science II: Comparing TDS and taste using turbulence, temperature, and different waters.

drawcoffee:

Brewing Science II: Comparing TDS and taste using turbulence, temperature, and different waters.

queerkhmer:

The traditional term for homosexuality in China is “the passion of the cut sleeve boys” (断袖之癖), so named from the story of Emperor Ai of Han (27 BCE - 1 BCE) and Dong Xian (23 BCE - 1 BCE). As the story goes, Emperor Ai fell in love with a minor official named Dong Xian. Dong Xian quickly gained the Emperor’s favor. One afternoon as they slept in bed, Emperor Ai woke up. Rather than wake his lover, he cut the sleeves of his robe to let his lover sleep longer. Homosexuality was regarded as a normal affair up until the late Qing dynasty when the government attempted to westernize the country.

queerkhmer:

The traditional term for homosexuality in China is “the passion of the cut sleeve boys” (断袖之癖), so named from the story of Emperor Ai of Han (27 BCE - 1 BCE) and Dong Xian (23 BCE - 1 BCE). As the story goes, Emperor Ai fell in love with a minor official named Dong Xian. Dong Xian quickly gained the Emperor’s favor. One afternoon as they slept in bed, Emperor Ai woke up. Rather than wake his lover, he cut the sleeves of his robe to let his lover sleep longer. Homosexuality was regarded as a normal affair up until the late Qing dynasty when the government attempted to westernize the country.

(via lgbtlaughs)